BEING A PATIENT ALLY IS PERSONAL.

                             AMY IACOPI

                             AMY IACOPI

I started Iacopi Health Research in 2016 after my mother was diagnosed with an unusual subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Just hearing the C word—cancer—overwhelmed and nearly paralyzed everyone in the family. The oncologists did a wonderful job taking care of my mother, but I noticed something missing: there was no one dedicated to addressing my mother’s—or both my parents’—needs and concerns beyond the medical aspects of the cancer.

Given my public health and policy background, I jumped into full-time private health research-and-support mode. With patience and persistence, I contacted experts, kept an updated list of the family’s questions and concerns, and connected my mother and family to vital resources, including emotional support services, cancer nutritionists, and medical librarians. In doing so, I found a new passion and talent for collaborating with patients so they can better understand their health diagnoses and treatment options, and feel more prepared, confident, and comforted through the entire experience.  
 
Friends dubbed me a “cancer doula” and began to enlist my guidance in their own health crises ranging from cancer to diabetes to knee surgeries. A greater need emerged as people outside of my immediate circle began contacting me for advocacy and support services. Iacopi Health Research was born.
 
I enjoy working with people of any age, gender, religion, culture, or identity. I have assisted clients through a sudden health crisis, elective or semi-elective surgery, and in planning for end-of-life care. Services are typically provided throughout the Bay Area and Northern California. 
 
My educational achievements include a Master of Public Health (MPH) in Health Policy from the University of Washington, and a BA from the University of California, Los Angeles. I live in San Francisco with my husband and two small children. My best days are spent with my family, hiking in the mountains and eating too much Indian food for dinner—but somehow still having room for dessert.